Fast Food; Fatty Liver

    How often do you eat “Fast Food in a week’s time?  Is it the best choice, or the easiest way to “Fit A Meal into your day?  Nutrition starts at birth. Life moves forward, “diet” becomes more hectic and evolves from being a way to live, to a way to survive.
     If you are asked to name two questions, routinely raised at any Doctor’s office, most people would correctly respond:
 “Do you drink?”
 “Do you smoke?”
      How often are patients probed to reflect on a daily routine at a yearly check-up with a medical inquiry of, “How many times a week or month do you eat fast food?”  One in five adults are identified with a form of Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.  It would stand to reason that if the doctor does not ask the patient about their food intake, the patient should be asking for a analysis of their liver enzymes.
 Recent research studies have proven  “A diet high in FAST FOOD consumption  leads to Liver Disease (Cirrhosis, or Cancer)”.  “Fatty Liver is the most common liver abnormality in children ages 2-9 years old,” revealed in The Office Journal of American Pediatrics      October, 2006.
    Liver disease can only be determined by having liver enzymes evaluated through a blood draw at a yearly check-up. Once diagnosed, recommendation’s will be made and a new dietary routine will be followed by the patient.

      Awareness about the quantity and quality of fast food, saturated with salt and boiling oil,

Fast food leads to Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

slowly kills the liver of adults and children, is the first critical step in re-thinking weekly meal plans  .

     The good news is that a Lifestyle Change improving on:  what is eaten, increased exercise,  avoidance of alcohol and limited sodium intake can return a damaged liver to a healthier state.

Once diagnosed with liver disease, your goal is to help the organ return to it’s normal functions, it’s ability to process everything that you eat and drink. A healthy lifestyle can help you feel your best and help your body cope with it’s disease. By eating


healthy and doing physical activity in moderation you will:

  1. Give your body the energy it needs to work well.
  2. Boost your immune system.
  3. Help your liver renew itself.

                                                         

           Eat Well….Enjoy the Healing Power of Food       Keep your energy level up by eating smaller meals and snacks more often. Organs filled with sodium must be flushed with foods high in Potassium: Sweet Potatoes, Baked Potato; Yogurt; Clams, Halibut; Lima, White and Soy Beans: Prunes, Kiwi, Bananas.

  1. Add, 6-8 glasses of water a day will assist in purifying the body from excess sodium and toxin’s.
  2. Enjoy light to moderate physical activity, such as walking, swimming, gardening
  3. Build up slowly to 30 to 60 minutes of activity, at least 4 times a week.
  4. Avoid food poisoning by storing and preparing foods safely. Wash your hands often.
  5. Talk to your health care provider if depression affects your ability to eat well.

Decrease some of the symptoms and the side effects of any treatments, such as feeling tired and sick by following a healthy diet.

  1. Carbohydrates: Whole grains, fruits and vegetables
  2. Fat: Healthy oils such as: Extra Virgin Olive, Canola oil, Avocado and Smart Balance oils. Omega 3, 6 reduces the inflammation in the liver: Fish, Walnuts, Flaxseed
  3. Protein: Fish (3 x’s / wk), Poultry, Lean Meat

What your body does not need 
1. Avoid alcohol.
2. Avoid foods that contain trans fat. Trans Fat must be 0 grams.
3. No more pretzels , chips, popcorn, french fries, cheese, certain meats, soy sauce and Avoid Sports Drinks. Salt, canned and processed foods must be limited.

Tasty fast food can happen in your own kitchen! After reflecting on the latest research consider preparing any of these healthy 7 Easy Recipes under 7 minutes!

Keep in communication with your doctor and dietitian so that neccessary adjustments can be made accordingly to your diet and physical activity plans.

By: K. Crocker

Literature Research
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/118/4/1388
http://organtransplant.mc.duke.edu/PDFs/Liver_Pre_3.pdf
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retr
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17006918&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17047295&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://magazine.wustl.edu/Winter05/SamuelKlein.htm

Reducing Triglycerides and Cholesterol

FOLLOW UP WITH: Cholesterol and Triglyceride Reducing Foods

Understanding Triglycerides in the correct amount   The body needs a supply of two types of  lipids/fats that circulate in our blood stream: triglycerides and cholesterol. Triglycerides are made in the liver and stored in fat cells, playing a key role in energy for muscle function. While this article in brief, takes a closer look at triglycerides it is equally important to keep its partner in mind, cholesterol, which is key for muscle cell membrane and making of hormone’s.  The liver builds triglycerides by using a glucose (sugar) with three fatty acids attached to it, however they can be made without food consumption as well.  After triglycerides are built, they can be stored in the liver, or sent to and stored within muscles.

     Three functions, of triglycerides are:
  1. Energy for all parts of the body.
  2. Insulation to help keep the body in homeostasis (balance of temperature).
  3. Provide adequate nutrition when we are sick, delivering fat vitamins (K, A, D, E).

How it works:  The liver creates triglycerides as stored energy. When energy levels become low, the hormone glucagon orders the fatty acids to be broken off of the sugar base. The sugar and fatty acids can both then enter energy production cycles

Cause and Effect:  The calorie is a measurement of heat energy. Carbohydrates and proteins contain only 4 calories per gram. Fats contain 9 calories per gram, thus providing the body with more than twice the amount of energy as sugars and proteins.  Triglycerides are the most concentrated form of energy found within the body, producing more than twice the amount of energy per gram than other forms of energy (protein and carbohydrates), which is why the body can store large amounts of triglycerides.

Clearing up the confusion:  Keep in mind that triglycerides are stored in fat cells and some muscle cells. While your body prefers to use fat as the main energy source, it should represent less than 30 percent of your diet. High-fat diets leave you at risk of obesity.  Your blood value must be <150 (less than 150).  More than 150 puts an individual at risk.

Fish, fruits, vegetables promote HDL Cholesterol to reduce LDL Cholesterol

An excess of triglycerides causes fat buildup in the liver and around the muscles, causing an increase in body fat percentage. Triglycerides are the most common type of fat found in your body and blood plasma. The body absorbs and uses all the energy consumed from food eaten throughout the day, getting rid of anything it cannot use turning it into triglycerides, storing them in your fat deposits.  As a body takes in more food than it can store, the unused food is stored as triglycerides in lipid cells, the more that this happens, the bigger the risk for the build up in the system, placing the individual at risk for diabetes, strokes and heat attacks.

Foods to eliminate in dietary intake in order to reduce triglyceride levels are:  Alcohol, Dairy, Pork, White Breads, Reduce Red Meat to 3 ounces twice a week.  

Read More: Remove Alcohol For Quick Weight Loss 

Food Pyramid for improved Health

Include these foods for improved Triglycerides Cholesterol and Triglyceride Reducing Foods and learn more about how to balance your meals by following Dietary Serving Guidelines . Increase Fish: Salmon, Anchovies, Sardines, Herring, Mackerel intake 4 times a week to improve quality of Omega 3 (healthy fat) and protein. By introducing fish into your lifestyle, the body responds to a fat that is easier to break down with protein that the organs need in order to have improved function. For fiber include 4 servings of Fruit and 5-7 servings of vegetables a day. Quality of vitamins and minerals is critical to a reduction of unwanted food that would otherwise by stored as triglycerides in fat (lipid) cells.  By doing so you can keep your HDL Cholesterol >70, the LDL Cholesterol <120 and Triglycerides <150.

Recipes to include in your diet

Tuna Steak

Roasted Pepper and Carrot Soup

Lemon Infused Chicken or Fish

Written by:  Kim Crocker Scardicchio

Control Obesity, Control Pathologies???

PLEASE VIEW!!!  Dr. Oz, a nationally renowned Physician, conducts a round table discussion on “Obesity and Diets” that may or may not contribute to pathologies.  What do we really know about nutrition and how it should be individualized?  Does obesity then relate to our hormonal and biochemical make-up?  What we do know is that an individual can change their DNA (as related to predipostion) make-up based on a two year dietary intake.

Globally, research is being done on nutrition and it’s impact leading up to certain pathologies.  The North American diet, with the exculsion of Alaska, is not healthy.   It has been shown that individuals in Asia, South Europe (mediterranean) and Central America have biomarkers that are healthier than what is found in other parts of the world.  Could this be related to the “essesntial fatty acids” found in omega 3, commonly found in fish and various seafood?  Could it be related to lifestyle, more walking and working with ones hands or more rest?  I look forward to hearing from the readers and what their experience has been.

Great information not commonly known amongst the public at large.

Dr. Mehmet Oz, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center (GUEST HOST); Gary Taubes, Journalist; Dr. Dean Ornish, Founder and President, Preventative Medicine Research Institute; Dr. Barbara Howard, Amer… (more)
Added: August 25, 2007
Category:  News & Politics

Fast Food…Cure Liver Disease w Lifestyle Change

If you are asked to name two questions that are routinely raised at any Doctor’s office, most people would correctly respond:
  •  “Do you drink?
  •  “Do you smoke?” 
Even as changes are clearly noted by individual’s with present day increased prices in Health Insurance, how often are patients probed to reflect on a daily routine at a yearly check-up with a medical inquiry of, “How often do you eat fast food?”
 Recent research studies have proven that, A diet high in FAST FOOD consumption  leads to LIVER DISEASE (Cirrhosis, or Cancer)”.  “Fatty liver is the most common liver abnormality in children ages 2-9 years old,” revealed in The Office Journal of American Pediatrics October, 2006.  Liver disease can only be determined by having liver enzymes evaluated through a blood draw at a yearly check-up with ones Doctor.  The good news is that a Lifestyle Change in:  diet,  exercise,  avoidance of alcohollimited sodium intake, and Tea can return a damaged liver to a healthy state.    (Sadly, this is not always the case with liver cancer.)

Once diagnosed with liver disease, your goal is to help the organ return to it’s normal functions, it’s ability to process everything that you eat and drink. A healthy lifestyle can help you feel your best and help your body cope with it’s disease. By eating healthy and doing physical activity in moderation you will:
1. Give your body the energy it needs to work well.
2. Boost your immune system.
3. Help your liver renew itself.

Eat Well
Keep your energy level up by eating smaller meals and snacks more often.  Decrease some of the symptoms and the side effects of any treatments, such as feeling tired and sick by following a healthy diet.

  1. Chew on Fennel Seeds throughout the day (not to exceed 1 tsp!) to unclog the liver. Add Turmeric to your meals . It is become a well known spice in the medicinal world that whose powerful nutrients are known for healing organs.
  2. Carbohydrates(grains, fruits and vegetables)
  3. Fat Healthy oils such as: Extra Virgin Olive, Canola oil, Avocado and Smart Balance oils. Omega 3, 6 reduces the inflammation in the liver: Fish, Walnuts, Flaxseed
  4. Protein: Fish (3 x’s / wk), Poultry, Lean Meat
  5. Salt, canned and processed foods must be limited.
  6. Focus on lower saturated fat choices with each meal.
  7. Drink 6 to 8 glasses of fluids every day.

     

ENJOY THE HEALING POWER

1. Eat foods high in potassium to offset salt intake. Bananas, Kiwi, apricots, raisins, tomato puree, baked or roasted potatoes, veal and nuts, will all assist in ridding the body of excess sodium.
2. Enjoy light to moderate physical activity, such as walking, swimming, gardening

3.Build up slowly to 30 to 60 minutes of activity, at least 4 times a week.
4. Avoid food poisoning by storing and preparing foods safely. Wash your hands often.
5. Talk to your health care provider if depression affects your ability to eat well.

What your body does not need
1. Avoid alcohol.
2. Avoid foods that contain trans fat. Trans Fat must be 0 grams.
3. Reduce Sodium intake!  No more pretzels , chips, popcorn, french fries, cheese, certain meats, soy sauce and Avoid Sports Drinks.
                                 

Keep in communication with your doctor and dietitian so that neccessary adjustments can be made accordingly to your diet and physical activity plans.

By: K. Crocker

Literature Research

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/118/4/1388
http://organtransplant.mc.duke.edu/PDFs/Liver_Pre_3.pdf

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retr
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17006918&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17047295&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://magazine.wustl.edu/Winter05/SamuelKlein.htm