Glycemic Load and Glycemic Index Recommendations

 Great way to lose weight, control heart problems and diabetes.
 Plan healthier meals utilizing the Glycemic Index
The Glycemic Index (GI) is a unique system that gives values to carbohydrates such as breads, fruits and vegetables so that you can understand how rapidly a carbohydrate turns into glucose.  Learning about the foods that contribute to excessive sugar circulation in your blood stream will assist in better understanding the foods that can benefit or work against the body.

Blood sugar must be maintained at a certain level, the brain signals the pancreas to release insulin, in order to breakdown food and bring the blood levels down to normal range by then converting excess sugar to fat.

Carbohydrates that break down quickly during digestion are given higher glycemic values (indices), while others that breakdown slowly receive lower glycemic values (indices). Once understood and put into practice, you may choose to not go back to eating the same way as before, but instead, properly monitor the nutrition intake in order to prolong the onset of diabetes.

Foods that break down rapidly:
Remove white breads, sugars.
Reduce or remove starchy vegetables: potatoes, corn, peas, various beans, winter squash, plantains, and yucca.
Reduce or remove certain fruits: Oranges, Pineapples, Bananas and other citrus foods, Apples, Pears, Peaches, Grapes, Strawberries, Blueberries, Cherries

Avoid eating foods with the following added ingredients: Fructose, Maltose, Sucrose, Corn Syrup and Gluten. It is highly advised that ALL food ingredients are reviewed before purchasing, including nuts and seeds.

Foods that break down slowly:
Whole grains and varied vegetables.
Add in fruits that are sour to taste: Apricots, Plums, Kiwi, Raspberries, juice of fresh Lemon or Limes sprayed onto meats, fish, poultry.
Add to juice of lemon to drinking water.
Add Cardio Exercise to your daily routine; heart rate should increase by 80% over normal resting heart rate and maintained for 30 minutes.

What is the glycemic load (GL)?

  • The Glycemic Load (GL)  is then defined by the total amount of carbohydrate contained in a specified serving of a particular food.
  • GL = GI  x grams of carbohydrate per serving/100
Glycemic Index (GI) Range Glycemic Load (GL) Range Glycemic Load per Day
Low GI = 55 or less Low GL = 10 or less Low GL < 80
Medium GI = 56-69 Medium GL = 11-19 High GL > 120
High GI = 70 or more High GL = 20 or more

It would be ideal to stay on a low glycemic diet which reflects eating food with a value given under 55. With a total low glycemic load of an optimal value of 80-120 per day.

CALCULATING A GLYCEMIC LOAD
Glycemic Load = Glycemic Index  x  Available Carbs (grams)/100
Example
Glycemic Index (GI) of 1 cup of banana is 51.4 (or 52)
Carbohydrate content of banana 45.5 ( 51.4 GI - 5.9 fiber = 45.5 carbs)
Glycemic Load = 52 GI x 45.5 Carbs/100 = 24 GL

Glycemic Food Index and Load provides a thorough list of foods with the Glycemic Load number to assist in making a more clear choice for your meals.

Foods that lead to a higher Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Value
Food
Glycemic Index
(Glucose=100)
Serving size
Carbohydrate per serving (g)
Glycemic Load per serving
Dates, dried
103
2 oz
40
42
Cornflakes
81
1 cup
26
21
Jelly beans
78
1 oz
28
22
Puffed rice cakes
78
3 cakes
21
17
Russet potato (baked)
76
1 medium
30
23
Doughnut
76
1 medium
23
17
Soda crackers
74
4 crackers
17
12
White bread
73
1 large slice
14
10
Table sugar (sucrose)
68
2 tsp
10
7
Pancake
67
6″ diameter
58
39
White rice (boiled)
64
1 cup
36
23
Brown rice (boiled)
55
1 cup
33
18
Pasta, semola/white; boiled 10-15 min
44
1 cup
40
18
Pasta, semola/white; boiled 5 min
38
1 cup
40
15
Pasta, whole wheat; boiled
37
1 cup
37
14
Rye, pumpernickel bread
41
1 large slice
12
5
Oranges, raw
42
1 medium
11
5
Pears, raw
38
1 medium
11
4
Apples, raw
38
1 medium
15
6
All-Bran™ cereal
38
1 cup
23
9
Skim milk
32
8 fl oz
13
4
Lentils, dried; boiled
29
1 cup
18
5
Kidney beans, dried; boiled
28
1 cup
25
7
Pearled barley; boiled
25
1 cup
42
11
Cashew nuts
22
1 oz
9
2
Peanuts
14
1 oz
6
1

It is important to follow the glycemic load if you have been identified with insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, diabetes or need to lose weight.

REFERENCES

GI and GL Range Values.  Chart provided by: University of Michigan
Glycemic Index Chart provided by the University of Sydney, Australia
http://www.med.umich.edu/umim/clinical/pyramid/grains.htm
http://www.glycemicindex.com/
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/foods/grains/gigl.html
http://www.nutritiondata.com/topics/glycemic-index
http://www.sharecare.com/question/is-insulin-resistance-diabetes

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